Review Blog

Jan 06 2015

The Book of Storms by Ruth Hatfield

cover image

Hot Key Books, 2014. ISBN: 9781471402982
(Age: 9+) Recommended. The night around him begins to burn with lightning; he closes his eyes and buries his face in the crook of his arm. Everything will be all right in the morning. His parents come back, and he eats breakfast with them and laughs about how silly it is to be scared by a thunderstorm. However long the night and thick and the darkness, however loud the roaring storm, the morning always comes.
Danny O'Neill's parents are storm chasers, and one morning they don't come back.
The only thing that the storm left behind is a charred branch from an old sycamore tree. A taro. With this stick Danny has the power to communicate with all of nature.
But an ancient and powerful man of darkness will stop at nothing to prevent Danny from finding his parents and will do everything in his power to silence him.
Danny must uncover the secrets of the Book of Storms and set off alone to save his parents - and the whole human race.
Ruth Hatfield's, The Book of Storms, really made me wonder if that is how we really do see things.
I would recommend this novel to children 9 and above as the storyline may be confusing to children any younger than that. This novel would also be a good read for families as it talks about the importance of family.
Jazmin Humphries, Year 7

Archived Blog Entries
Latest News
2020 Teens' Top Ten Nominees
Hugo Award Finalists 2020
Book explaining the coronavirus
Feel good and uplifting books for primary children
Humour for teens fiction list
CBCA Shortlists 2020
Carnegie and Greenaway Medals shortlist 2020

ReadPlus Features
Print similar authors bookmark
Read similar authors
How to find lesson plans
Sample theme animation

Promote Reading
Feel good and uplifting books for staff
Online Children's Storytime Websites List
Free Rights of the Reader Poster
Children's Laureate's charter